The Vision Behind WSO2 User Engagement Server

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“A picture worth a thousand words” is a known fact which doesn’t need proof. At present we discuss about the value and the power of data. We use various tools to analyze them, we do business intelligence capturing trends or anomalies. However in the end you need to express the meaning in a sensible manner for the key decision makers. Would you go write thousand words or rather draw something, summarize the findings and let the stakeholder explore for more.

WSO2 Middleware stack has all the pieces you need to harvest, store & analyze (both real-time and periodical) vast amount of data sets, but when it comes to summarizing and presenting, the stack had somewhat a week tool set. We envisioned the idea of “SOA Last Mile” since latter part of 2009 with products such as WSO2 Gadget Server, WSO2 Mashup Server and frameworks such as viskit. We experimented, wrote code and delivered enterprise grade products to achieve this vision.  For instance WSO2 Gadget Server was one of the most downloaded products during 2010 – 2011 time span, and even now people are using it for various data presentation purposes.

Continue reading The Vision Behind WSO2 User Engagement Server

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The Container and the Content

– Ajahn Brahm

A local journalist called and asked me “ What would you do, Ajahn Brahm, if someone took a Buddhist Holy Book and flushed it down the toilet?”

Without hesitation I answered “Sir, if someone took a Buddhist Holy Book and flushed it down the toilet, the first thing I would do is call a plumber!”

Continue reading The Container and the Content

Reading an XML file into WSO2 ESB; Transform it and expose it as an API

Recently was working on a project where I had a to read an XML file from an FTP location, transform it and expose it as an API. Used WSO2 ESB 4.6.0 for this usecase; and I thought of documenting it for later reference. So here it goes

First the proxy that read the file from FTP and dump it to a defined location, (VFSProxy.xml)

This proxy will dump the file to "home/nuwanbando/temp/files/out" location.

This file need to be read on-demand, once requested. ESB by default does not have a mediator to read XML files so that the mediation flow can manipulate the content, Continue reading Reading an XML file into WSO2 ESB; Transform it and expose it as an API

Discovering Admin Services in a WSO2 (Carbon) Server

This should be a quick how-to type guide; This method will work in any Carbon Based WSO2 Server (AS, ESB, BPS etc). I am taking WSO2 ESB as the example.

      1. Download the ESB and extract it. (lets say I extracted to {ESB_HOME})
      2. You will want to see the service contracts once you discover them so navigate to
        {ESB_HOME}/repository/conf

        and open carbon.xml

      3. make, HideAdminServiceWSDLs to false
        <HideAdminServiceWSDLs>false</HideAdminServiceWSDLs>

        and save the document

      4. Start the ESB with OSGI Console
        sh {ESB_HOME}/bin/wso2server.sh -DosgiConsole
      5. Once the server is started, push few return keys (hit enter) to get the OSGI shell in the console
      6. In the OSGI shell type
        osgi> listAdminServices
      7. That will give a list of services as shown below,
      1. All right now you want to see the service contract, lets select “Authentication Admin” Service which is listed as
AuthenticationAdmin, AuthenticationAdmin, https://192.168.219.1:8243/services/AuthenticationAdmin
    1. Take the url from the list and paste it in the browser with ?wsdl at the end, that will give the entire contract of the service

Happy Hacking 🙂

 

{jaggery.js}

Is something I’ve been working on at wso2 for sometime, if you are following me I have tweeted the updates, releases etc. Jaggery went live with its fifth milestone, few weeks ago at jaggeryjs.org, its still young and has alot to improve.

Explaining a little bit about jaggery; Its NOT an alternative to node, its simply a toolkit to easily compose webapps and apis. Its a completely javascript way of writing all parts of the web application, and communicate throughout in json. Jaggery has out of the box features to create RESTfull applications, and its one of it’s value propositions. Jaggery can be easily extended via modules which can be written in javascript or java for that matter.

A very simple page that prints out some request properties in jaggery looks like,

<html>
   <body>
      <p>
      <%
          print("Method : " + request.getMethod() + "<br/>");
          print("Protocol : " + request.getProtocol() + "<br/>");
          print("User-Agent : " + request.getHeader("User-Agent"));
      %>
      </p>
   </body>
</html>

Jaggery docs site also provide a tool for you to try out some code and play around. So you can simply copy the above code and paste in jaggery try-it

I recently did a webinar on jaggery that explains the simple case, over looking its API and samples. Below is the recording hope it’ll help.